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20130115
20130123
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KQED (PBS) 25
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English 25
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
, one-fifth of europe's energy needs. so there are serious implications that could come out of this. >> suarez: you've got a nato partner in france fighting against a guerrilla army in mali. it's not an easy task, is it? >> not at all. from a logistical standpoint i thought the itn reporter was spot on when she talked about the logistical issues that are inherent in any kind of war, but they are particularly in hernt in one where the climate is difficult, where the terrain is almost impossible and where you're really not used to configureing your forces in a way that allows you to move rapidly in this kind of terrain. it's very much adown the american southwest and it is a very, very difficult area not only from the standpoint of things like temperature and mountains and things of that nature, it's the nature of the terrain that makes it very difficult to move from one point to another. >> suarez: we've been covering the fight in mali over the last several days but algeria hasn't been in the news for a long time. what's the state of play there? who's running the place? >> there's a
by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >>> tonight on quest: some people oppose nuclear energy for reasons of cost and safety. but others say that we can't reduce greenhouse gas emissions if nuclear isn't part of the equation. quest meets an engineer who's striving to make nuclear energy safer. >>> and -- every year, more than 300 species of birds migrate through the bay area along the pacific flyway. what can shifts in the birds flight paths tell us about our environment? >>> support for quest is provided by the s. d. bechtel, jr. foundation -- the david b. gold foundation -- the dirk and charlene kabcenell foundation -- the vadasz family foundation -- the wyncote foundation -- the amgen foundation --
technology in place, the new energy savings for global airlines and on pace to double the number of dream liners it delivered it year. started out in 2011 which was already late with just 346 last year, more than 80 this year. with this uncertainty what kind of threat to its earnings gross potential. >> it's interesting. when you talk about the dream liner and boeing, when you talk about earnings over the next two years, most analysts have this booked at zero margin so from an eps perspective there is really no impact from a revenue going forward it will be around 20% of revenue, so the story for boeing is not necessarily earnings, it's cash generation so, the market is looking for, you know, when will the 787 turn cash positive versus accounting positive. and so that before all of this was a number sort of late 2014, 2015. >> so you have gone to sell here with boeing shares trading in the low 70s with this kind of headline risk call, not necessarily a financial concern. at what point would boeing share price present just a compelling value would you have to buy it? >> well, for us, you k
to americans here? >> of algeria is an important energy exporter and an important country. this is a threat to of jury out. we see the expansion of rebels and these groups coming in, this is a potent threat and a huge area that needs to be dealt with. >> to syria where the bbc team has found evidence of a massacre that takes place on the edge of palms. our international correspondent has just returned from the village and it contains images some viewers might find distressing. >> of the army took the stand. the villages just around the corner from -- the army took us in. the village is just around the corner. there is a powerful sense of shock. one woman starts telling her story as soon as she sees us. they stormed into my house, she told me. they slapped my face, they stripped me and my daughters. most of the killings took place in houses down this hill. they have cleared the area and taken away the bodies. they persuaded us to take another route. in the first house they take as to -- us to a charred body. there is a bullet hole in the center of the forehead. full horror emerges. there is
. the purpose would be, he wrote, to embarrass the administration, to destroy the energy of the government and to substitute the pleasure, caprice or artifices, to the regular decisions of a respectable majority. that's just what the republicans have been doing. since 2007 when they lost the majority in the senate, they mounted or threatened to mount nearly 400 filibusters, blocking everything from equal pay to equal work, job bills and reform. as a result, there are more vacancies on the federal courts today than when president obama first took office. but hold on. when democrats were in the minority and threatening to filibuster against george w. bush's judicial nominees, their leader, harry reid, had some kind things to say about the tactic. >> the filibuster serves as a check on power and preserves our limited government. right now the only check on president bush is the democrats' ability to voice their concern in this body, the senate. if the republicans roll back our rights in this chamber, there will be no check on power. the radical right wing will be free to pursue anything they
onboard. so those are two events help give energy to those two. >> if there is any complaint that obama supporters have had the last four years as if the president hasn't been hard enough, so is this the opportunity? >> those things appear to be going. >> he's what will be interesting sheer to see whether the president exploits weaknessst in the republican party. he certainly did it in the primary where is basically he took the most extreme position on immigration which is what mitt romney had hit. and mitt romney did poorly with hit panics. he's trying to figure out they no longer can rely the votes of white men. so so there's a conflict. che get republicans at each other. he certainly has already on these fiscalish issues. so does that creates some opportunities for him. are there republicans who are going to say, maybe we need to as a party change and maybe kind of come to some kind of an agreement. the campaign organize and turning it into a grass roots priorities type let's see -- >> 10 1. >> i knew that. >> i'm a little bit skeptical about this. i'm trying to hear about this actu
and the fact that he sees he needs to get out more and connect more, he needs that energy more that will inform the way he speaks to the public because then they're in his head not just the tell prompter of a written word. >> rose: are we disagreeing with what bob said in terms of making the point that you have to be -- you can do that and reach to explain your case and explain your vision and be able to tell your narrative but you don't necessarily to go out of your way to attack the other guy on a consistent basis or in fact have harry reid or nancy pelosi come out and attack them all the time if you're trying to get something done that demands an agreement with the other side. bob? >> first of all, charlie, one thing you have to is president obama does not control harry reid or nancy pelosi they are more than anxious -- >> despite how he might wish. >> yeah, in willing to come out and attack republicans on their own spontaneously and with sincere conviction. >> rose: do you think that's helpful? >> no, i think it doesn't work and i think he's got a real problem with that. but i think of very
have the china exposure. others benefit from energy and infrastructure or improvement in housing so it seemed like there were fundamental reasons to be more optimistic on that group of stocks. >> susie: okay. well, we'll see how it goes this year. thanks for coming on the program. we've been speaking with adam pozen. >> susie: it's not easy being a retailer these days, especially if you rely on customers buying at your store. many consumers come in and browse, but make their purchases online. but tech innovations are helping to change that. erika miller got a sneak peek at the intel booth at the national retail federation's convention. >> reporter: adidas had a problem. that's the company most americans call "adidas". it needed to figure out how to get customers to buy merchandise in its stores, instead of on- line for less. it found the answer in this interactive display, which has boosted traffic, and dollars spent per transaction. >> normally, in a physical store you can get maybe 200 different products. but with this, you are not really limited. but rather than just put a little
or representatives debated relief from superstorm sandy today. energy analyst kevin book expects governments will increasingly be forced to spend money to mitigate or adapt to climate change. >> with every storm, with every flood, we're getting closer and closer to talking about how he handle climate change rather than how we stop it. >> reporter: pressure to address climate change may also come from outside the united states. the european union is threatening to slap trade the u.s. refuses to buy credits to offset greenhouse gas emissions from transatlantic flights. even china may help force the u.s. to act. beijing is under pressure to clear the air as pollution makes it harder and harder to breath. >> coal pollution, including greenhouse gas emissions, is something they have got to get down in their country if they're going to live there. as the largest emitter, the bogey man to which all western nation's point, begins to clean up its game, it's going to make it harder to say no. >> reporter: and progressives are hoping the president will bypass congress and use his regulatory authority u
%. the energy and utility sectors both were higher by 0.9% earnings were in focus with plenty of attention on general electric. the conglomerate earned 44 cents per share, a penny better than estimates and up from a year ago. g.e. said demand from china and other emerging economies helped offset the uncertainty with customers in the u.s. and europe. shares gained 3.5%. volume tripled with the stock closing above $22 for the first time since october. g.e. said boeing has not changed its delivery schedule for g.e. jet engines used on the 787 dreamliner jet. investment bank morgan stanley had a much stronger than anticipated end to the year with investment banking and trading revenues up sharply. that helped the company earn 45 cents per share, reversing a year ago loss and well above what was expected. the bank has been trying to shift its business away from trading for its own behalf into more of a wealth advisory and client-focused model. shares rallied 7.9%. volume tripled as the stock sits at 17 month highs. like other investment banks, morgan stanley has been helped out by companies rai
energy producer and largest producer of calories, producer of calories, of food, the technology development, overwhelmingly based in the u.s. our demographics are pretty good, housing is picking up, we have a lot of money, this doesn't speak well for unemployment in the u.s. and doesn't speak well well for a lot of people doing the way they used to our their kids but in terms of looking at the united states, our risk wasn't called the u.s., the risk was called washington politics, the problem is it is precisely that relative comfort that allows washington to shrink into the miasma it continues to. >> rose: japan is the jibs. >> the jibs. >> it is kind of interesting, right after i say the united states is doing well, we have a situation with america's key allies in the three most important regions of the world to us are actually under a lot of stress. >> rose: really? >> and there are really three things happening in world that matter right now geo politically, one is china is rising, one is middle east is exploding and the third is europe is muddling through, and those three th
for greater conservation and renewable energy. and, he oversaw a moratorium on offshore drilling after the b.p. oil spill in 2010. industry groups said the shutdown cost thousands of jobs, but salazar defended it today in his departure statement. attackers in algeria stormed a b.p. natural gas complex today and took dozens of foreigners hostage, including seven americans. at least two people were killed. one was british. the nationality of the other was unclear. we have a report from chris ship of "independent television news." >> reporter: the gas facility in southern algeria which early this morning was attacked by a group, claiming to be islamist militants, and where tonight that group is holding several hostages-- a number thought to be british. another briton who worked here is reported to have been killed. a jihadist group with links to al qaida in northern africa claims its holding 40 hostages. this man-- mokhtar belmoktar-- claimed yesterday days they were seeking retaliation for the french military action in mali. a day later the algerian gas field was attacked. the gas field is at
what i do and have been doing it very a very long time, the energy and determination and competitive spirit that still surges through all your veins. barbara walters is, what, 64 years old? she kills every day to win an interview. people of her, quist in britain would have been retired by 70 and tending their begonias in a garden somewhere but she wants to beat me every single day to a booking. i can't think of a more inspiring place to work in my particular chosen profession because you feel you're with the most competitive people for the biggest guess on the biggest platform. for any interviewer-- and we're all egomaniacs at hart, really. we love people to watch our interviews. this is the place to be if you want to be -- >> rose: at this table. >> this very table. >> rose: thank you, piers. piers morgan, good to have you. captioning sponsored by rose communications captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening, i'm tom hudson. norwegian cruise lines sails to big gains on its first day as a publicly trade
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)